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20121128
20121128
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
class taxes low, but will congress go along with higher taxes for the rich? plus, a long secret u.s. plan, get this, to explode an atomic bomb on the moon. what were they thinking? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> today we may be at the tipping point for one of the most important decisions president obama needs to make as he begins his second term. on capitol hill republicans including moderate republicans are sending the president a clear warning, don't nominate susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. rice is the current u.s. ambassador to the united nations. she spent a second day meeting with senators trying to explain some of her inaccurate comments she made after the september 11th terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. cnn's senior congressional correspondent dana bash is joining us now from capitol hill with the very latest. what happened today, dana? >> reporter: wolf, it was one thing for susan rice to be criticized harshly yesterday by the three republicans she met with because they had been among her harshest c
of the american people, tweet using #my 2 k, e-mail, post it on a member of congress's facebook wall. do what it takes to communicate a sense of urgency. >> on the other side of pennsylvania avenue, john boehner says he thinks there is a way to avoid that cliff. >> it's time for the president and democrats to get serious about the spending problem that our country has, but i'm optimistic we can continue to work together to avert this crisis and sooner rather than later. >> and look who's coming to lunch. mitt romney will break bread with the president at the white house tomorrow. >> pledge of allegiance, anti-tax crusader grover norquist warns republicans against breaking their promise. >> it is possible if the republicans lose in such a way they've got their fingerprints on the murder weapon, then you have a problem. bush couldn't run again in '92 successfully because he had his fingerprints on a very bad deal, bad on spending and bad on taxes and he broke his word. >> what is alan simpson's message to grover? we'll ask him in a few minutes. >> how do you deal with guys who came to stop gove
. >> got five minutes for us today? >> um... [ticking] >> we wondered how the man who could whistle up a corporate jet on a whim... >> let's rock. >> or throw a $2 million birthday party was doing in his reduced circumstances. what's it like to go from king of the world to prisoner number 05a-4820 serving 8 to 25 years behind bars? >> in my wildest imagination, when i would project myself into my late 50s and early 60s, where i would be or what i would be doing, if i make a list of 100 different places or 100 different things, here would never make that list. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm morley safer. in this edition, we look at stories of crime, punishment, and what money can buy. first, the high-stakes world of japanese organized crime, where big dollars saved the life of an infamous gangster. then we investigate how best-selling author and philanthropist greg mortenson used some of the assets of his multimillion-dollar charity. and finally, we talk to dennis kozlowski, the former ceo who once made headlines for illegal corporate excess. we begin with the yakuza, japan's not
the problem. >> david cay johnson, great to have you with us. that's "the ed show." "the rachel maddow show" starts right now. good evening, rachel. >> good evening, ed. thanks, man. thank you for staying with us for this hour. the acting director of the cia met for more than an hour with senators john mccain and lindsey graham along with the u.n. ambassador susan rice. the three senators emerged from the meeting saying they were honored by the fact that the cia director would meet with them, just three random senators and not in some official capacity testifying before committee on the hill. they appreciated the fact that the administration and the intelligence community was going to such lengths to e swaj their concerns to personally answer their questions about the libya attack in a closed-door meeting with the cia director himself, even though these are just three random senators. the senators said their questions were answered as reasonably could be expected and they were willing to consider the president's nominee for secretary of state. they were throwing hear out those nominations f
and heading into the new year. and it would give us more time than next year to work together on a comprehensive plan to bring down our deficits, to streamline our tax system, to do it in a balanced way, including asking the wealthiest americans to pay a little more so we can invest in training, education, science, and research. now, i know some of this may sound familiar to you because we talked a lot about this during the campaign. this shouldn't be a surprise to anybody. this was a major debate in the presidential campaign and in congressional campaigns all across the country and a clear majority of americans, not just democrats but also a lot of republicans and a lot of independents agreed we should have a balanced approach to deficit reduction that doesn't hurt the economy and doesn't hurt middle class families. and i'm glad to see, if you've been reading the papers lately, that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's
to the powerball game. what can you tell us about that? >> reporter: it seems the lottery commission doubled the price of a powerball ticket from $1 to $2 in hopes of generating more revenue, but something interesting happened, sales initially went down and then they got a pop and went back up. sales really increased because people started talking about it. all that buzz happened, that jackpot grew and grew over the months, the jackpots for the powerball. in the end it increased sales and that generates revenue for states because, of course, you have to pay taxes on any of your winnings. so with the lot he commission increasing the price was generate revenue. they did and wow they will with this jackpot of $500 million. >> alison, did you buy a ticket? >> reporter: oh, no, i have no problem admitting it. i will go ahead and buy a few tickets of my own. >> good luck to you. thank you. we'll talk to you soon. >>> the other big story this morning, if at once you don't succeed, try, try again. susan rice, the u.n. ambassador returns for a second round of meeting with republican senators. rice fa
by storm. struggling to get the fiscal cliff deal done. joining us, senior vice president of washington research, thank you for joining us. >> thank you. melissa: what do you read of the bits coming out, how do you think it is going the closer we are to reaching a deal. >> we are still weeks away from a deal. we will get something before christmas, but look at the thursday, friday, saturday before christmas. you look at the public statement, digested a little bit and kind of figure out what is going on behind the scenes. there have been talks going on behind the scenes, just don't thinthink they have all been as productive as we would like them to be yet. the real negotiating just beginning to pick up now. melissa: it seems like they're looking under every rock for more revenue. we were hearing about federal gas tax, talking but obviously raising taxes on anyone who makes more than $250,000 but you don't hear anything serious about cutting spending or entitlement or anything. >> i think the white house thinks we are in a better place than they were a year and a half ago so they're stayi
and whether the president needs to take a bigger role. >>> plus, the u.n. ambassador to the u.s. susan rice, admits the talking points she used after the benghazi attack were wrong. republicans call her answers troubling. >>> and a former mayor spent her life taking on thugs in her town. her fight and her life tonight are now over. let's go out front. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett "outfront" tonight, where in the world is president obama? it's been 11 days since he met with congressional leaders on the fiscal cliff. and with impending doom as a lot of people describe it, just 35 days away, key lawmakers say the president hasn't worked hard enough with them to broker a deal. >> rather than sitting down with lawmakers of both parties and working out an agreement, he's back on the campaign trail presumably with the same old talking points that we're all quite familiar with. >> well, now, as far as top democrats are concerned, things haven't been going so well since that november 16th kumbaya meeting at the white house. >> we had a meeting, it went very well. the problem was that
for us to talk abo about. we cannot stand by the sidelines in denial untouched, unamended, medicare is going to run out of money in 12 years. that is scary. >> but it's what durbin didn't say that was striking. in his prepared remarks durbin was going to say the following. quote, progressives should be willing to talk about ways to ensure the long-term viability of social security, medicare and medicaid, but those conversations should not be part of a plan to avert the fiscal cliff. durbin never said those remarks. he left that out. he later said he stood by those comments, and he did argue that medicare shouldn't be part of any up front down payment on the debt but part of the next year's long longer term negotiation. now while the short term talk to republicans may be tough, the longer term message to liberals is clear. entitlements in some form or fashion will need to be on the table. that means medicare. and a new "washington post"/abc poll shows just how politically tough making any changes to medicare will be. across party lines respondents said they are opposed to increasing
's. she seemed to make those angry lawmakers even angrier about the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get. >> bottom line, i'm more disturbed now than i was before. >> she misled the american public. i think that she would say that. she would have to say that. >> white house responded by ratcheting up the attack on republican critics and their motives. >> the focus on, some might say obsession on, comments made on sunday shows seems to me and to many to be misplaced. >> cnn's dan lothian is at the white house. so, dan, is it even worth -- is it even worth the president nominating susan rice? because there just doesn't seem to be any meeting of the minds about her on the republican side. >> reporter: you're right. i guess it's always possible that the woit house could give up the fight on her but also possible is that if the president believes she is the right person for that position, then i don't think this is something that will move him off of susan rice. but nonetheless, the white
class. you can use the term as president obama does holding the middle class hostage. what they are trying to do is hold the one chip they have to bargain and that is the tax hikes on the middle class. they don't want to give up the farm of tax increases on the wealthy -- in other words, if they give it all up now then they won't have anything to bargain with after january. if they already agreed to tax increases on the wealthy and that goes into play when we get to the middle -- and the middle class is protected, what do the republicans have to bargain with? >> nothing. this would not be a good time for the republicans from a bargaining standpoint in terms of getting what they want, which is the tax reform, rewrite of the tax code, dealing with entitlements. unless they get stuff now they are not going to get it later. they are much less likely to get it later. the president figures they can take them right up to the edge and their nerve will break at the end facing a tax increase for all federal income tax payers. that enough of them will come over to expose top income ea
a lot of us worried that we're at the mercy of a feckless congress behaving more like stubborn kids than responsible lawmakers. wait. we did promise you a dream off the top of the show. imagine for a moment what it would be like if none of this fiscal cliff nonsense mattered the least bit to you. no debts. no family budgets. and a half billion dollars worth of powerball dreams. that is the jackpot, folks. the powerball jackpot. it just so happens to take millions of us buying up tickets to fatten up that jackpot to that big old size. alison kosic is at a 7-eleven in new york basically meeting a few of the wanna-be one percenters. the truth of the matter, what are the odds? >> reporter: i know. i hate to throw cold water on your whole dream statement that you gave. yes this is all about dreams but you know the odds of winning are really low. 175 million to 1. those are your odds. you know what? i can't help but dream, too. i got a ticket here. one ticket, it could be the winning one. a lot of people lining up throughout the day here at this particular convenience store are sort of hoping
>> does anybody have a power ball ticket? >> yes. >> oh, really? i better get one. >> some of us would like extra money, melissa. >> i'm melissa lee, thanks for watching, see you we may very well go over the fiscal cliff come january and i want to be ready to climb back out with the right stock after it happens. you can't come from a given day like today, dow 107 points, hey, happy days are here again, right? this is a day where my equipment felt a little -- felt a little superfluous because we had all sorts of happy talk for a bunch of people in washington about how compromise was within reach. however, i think it's been increasingly apparent that we actually may not get a deal in time of the january deadline, something warren buffett pointed out. you don't need to change your philosophy just because we cliffed you. long term it might not matter. not all of you share his sangwin multi-year view of stocks. he can afford to take the long view. if we take the plunge over the cliff, it can cost everyone $2 million, makes everyone pay more in taxes. i don't really want to have this g
of congress what a a $2,000 tax hike would mean to you. write them a comment, tweet it using m2k. not y2k. we figured that would make it easier to remember. >> you have the president mobilizing the citizens to put pressure on the congress, ana marie. >> this is actually something pretty familiar to people who have been watching the white house for any number of election cycles. going back to, at least in my memory when i started in 200, you are trying to mobilize your apparatus. this is the time to do it, if you're going to do it. and you have obama supporters willing to retweet anything that the president says. i do hope that they can use this at this point. i'm not optimistic that this is something that can continue. people aren't going to remain as engaged. i do think that's probably what is going to happen, if anything. of course, it's still from a perspective hard to understand. it's only intel jabl if you buy into the weird social and political calculus that is the congress. >> but if he waits until january 3rd -- >> right. >> -- we will be over the so-called fiscal cliff, joy. >> right
this bump in the road would give us that. >> as you know, there are a lot of people who would disagree with you about that, not just about the financial numbers per se, say the $200 billion the president is talking act next year, but also from a psychological standpoint. we've already seen wall street reacting in a negative way, concerned exactly about what would happen if a deal doesn't get made and their growing sense that it might not happen. consumer confidence has been up. americans concerned that their taxes are going to go up. you don't think that those are legitimate concerns? >> i think we can assure people that we would fix it early in january. wall street -- >> why should they believe that, congressman, with all due respect when what they were hearing before the election was it was going to get done by the end of the year? >> i don't know where they heard that from or they heard it from credibly. look, the republicans want to be reasonable, great. but we're still dealing with the existing congress. it's a lame duck. and you've got a lot of the most radical tea party members
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)